We're not technically into Spring yet, but a peek ahead to what Farmer's Almanac is predicting for Missouri's upcoming summer is a little bit terrifying.

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Farmer's Almanac has been predicting seasons for over 100 years. They've just shared their prediction for Missouri's summer of 2023 and the words "sweltering" and "pressure cooker" are being used.

Infographic, Farmer's Almanac
Infographic, Farmer's Almanac
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Broiling wet? That air conditioner is gonna make the electric bill more than a little scary if it's accurate.

Just like someone who's gone to the doctor and gotten bad news, I decided to seek out a 2nd opinion. In this case, it was from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. The bad news is their 3-month outlook more or less agrees with what Farmer's Almanac is saying. Notice we're in the darker area.

NOAA Climate Prediction Center
NOAA Climate Prediction Center
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If there's good news, it appears we're right on the bubble of having higher than normal temps than not. Someone find the Jim Carrey "you're saying there's a chance" GIF.

I would advise you check out what Farmer's Almanac says for yourself. Let's hope there's an update at some point where they say "whoops, our bad...we were wrong". In the meantime, make sure that air conditioner and box fan collection is prepared for the worst.

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