Pasta is my Achilles heel and recently Food Network just released a list of the 98 Best Pasta in the Country and five restaurants made the list from Illinois & Missouri.

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I could eat pasta with broccoli, pasta with lentils, pasta with sauce, and without, you name it I can eat pasta. However, when I saw the restaurants on the list for the best of the best for their pasta dishes I think my stomach got a little happy.

Missouri

Missouri made the list two from St. Louis and one from Kansas City, and I want to visit all three places and try these dishes for myself. First up, located in St. Louis the Pastaria Restaurant for their Pistachio Ravioli dish they offer. Covered in lemon butter, mint, and just looks delicious. Pastaria made the list at number 25.


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The second restaurant that made the list at number 46 is Jasper's Restaurant in Kansas City. The dish highlighted on the list is their famous Scampi Alla Livornese, anything that is scampi I'm on board. This dish is a family secret and tradition and is top secret, but one of the famous dishes to have at Jasper's.

 

 

 

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Illinois

Giant in Chicago makes the list at number 48 for good reason. Their dish King Crab Tagliatelle is a mix of saffron, king crab, and chile butter. So a pasta dish with a little kick to it.


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Our final pasta dish comes from Osteria Langhe and the dish is called Plin. Many of the dishes are for the low-card diet pasta fan, and from-scratch, slow-food-style dishes that people from all over come to enjoy.

Whether you make a dish at home or go to one of these restaurants pasta is just that dish everyone just loves. Make it with just butter, sauce, or get creative it's just a famous meal for everyone to enjoy.

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